Project Management

Principal Investigators

Robert Mattes is Professor of Political Studies at the University of Cape Town. He is also a co-founder and co-Director of the Afrobarometer, a regular survey of public opinion in 18 African countries. His research has focused on the development of democratic attitudes and practices in South Africa and across the continent. He is the co-author (with Michael Bratton and E. Gyimah-Boadi) of Public Opinion, Democracy and Markets In Africa (Cambridge University Press, 2004). Mattes’s most recent articles have appeared in journals such as the American Journal of Political Science, World Development, Journal of Democracy, and Democratisation, and Party Politics.

View R. Mattes' Curriculum Vitae.

Shaheen Mozaffar is Professor of Political Science and Research Associate at the Centre of Legislative Studies, Bridgewater State University in Boston, Massachusetts. He is also a Research Fellow at the African Studies Center at Boston University, and Visiting Research Associate of the Center for Social Science Research at the University of Cape Town. His research focuses on the comparative analysis of constitutional design and institutional choice, including electoral systems, party systems, the role legislatures, and ethnopolitics in emerging African democracies and elsewhere. He has consulted with USAID and the United Nations on issues of democratic governance, including electoral systems in emerging democracies, was a Diplomacy Fellow in the USAID Latin American Bureau, and worked as a member of an international team of experts on the 2005 Iraqi elections for the International Mission for Iraqi Elections. Mozaffar’s most recent articles have appeared in the Handbook of Party Politics, American Political Science Review, Party Politics, and International Political Science Review.

Joel D. Barkan is Professor Emeritus of Political Science and International Programs at the University of Iowa, and an internationally recognized specialist on issues of democratization and governance across Anglophone Africa. From 1992 to 1994, he served as the first regional democracy and governance advisor for Eastern and Southern Africa at USAID. Since then he has straddled the worlds of academe and the policy community by consulting periodically for USAID, UNDP, the US Department of State (INR) and the Africa Public Sector and Capacity Building unit (AFTPR) at the World Bank. Over the past decade Dr. Barkan has been a visiting fellow or faculty member at the United States Institute of Peace (1997-1998), the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars (2001-2002), the University of Cape Town (2004 and 2005), and the National Endowment for Democracy (2000, 2005-2006) and Princeton University (2006-2007). He is also Senior Associate at the Africa Program of the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington DC. His most recent articles have appeared in Foreign Affairs, Journal of Democracy and American Journal of Political Science. He is the editor and co-author of Legislative Power in Emerging African Democracies, the first comparative study of legislatures in Africa (Lynne Rienner Publishers, forthcoming, July 2009), and the co-author of The Legislative Connection: The Politics of Representation in Kenya, Korea and Turkey (Duke University Press, 1984). Review of Legislative Power in Emerging African Democracies, Edited by Joel D. Barkan.

Joel Barkan tragically passed away on 10 January 2014.  He was on a family vacation in Mexico City with his wife Sandra, son and daughter-in-law, where he suffered a pulmonary embolism. Read more.

Senior Research Associates

Tim Hughes holds an MA (cum laude) from the University of Cape Town. He was a researcher at UCT’s Institute for Public Policy and lectured at UCT until 2001. Tim established SAIIA’s parliamentary liaison programme in Cape Town and ran SAIIA’s SADC parliamentary research programme, as well as its Lesotho Democracy Programme. He has written a book on South Africa’s foreign policy in the post-apartheid period and was team leader on the SAIIA SADC future scenarios programme. Tim was series editor for the Strengthening Parliamentary Democracy in SADC Reports as well as for a series of papers on opposition politics in SADC. He is the Editor of the SADC Strengthening Parliamentary and Civil Society Relations Handbook.

 

Kimberly Smiddy is a Senior Research Associate of the African Legislatures Project at the University of Cape Town and formerly served as the Project Manager. She is based in Malawi, and as an independent consultant she works as a parliamentary development specialist throughout southern Africa. Kimberly previously served as the Democracy and Governance Advisor at USAID/Malawi where she managed the parliamentary strengthening program implemented by NDI. Kimberly has provided consultancy services for SADC-PF, DFID, the Norwegian Embassy, GTZ, USAID, SUNY, RTI, FES, and UNDP. She has 14 years of parliamentary experience in Africa and has worked in evaluating and designing legislative strengthening programs in many different countries. She has worked with parliaments and MPs in more than 10 countries, including Angola, Bangladesh, Botswana, Kenya, Malawi, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia. Kimberly was a PhD candidate, ABD, in Political Science at Michigan State University. She earned her MA in Political Science from Michigan State University with a specialization in African Politics and BA summa cum laude in Political Science and Sociology from the University of Tennessee.

Shana Warren is the Programme Manager for Francophone Africa of the African Legislatures Project at the University of Cape Town. She is based in New York, and works as an independent consultant specializing in transparency, accountability and parliamentary development. Shana previously served as a Projects Officer at the One World Trust in London where she managed the development of an online resource of civil society self-regulation worldwide. Shana has provided consultancy services as a parliamentary specialist for Pact, the Independent Evaluation Office of the IMF, and Revenue Watch Institute, and previously served as the ALP Research Associate for Zambia. She has 6 years of experience undertaking research and assessment with parliaments, MPs, and civil society in the Czech Republic, Ghana, Togo and Zambia. Shana earned her MA in International Affairs from the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) in Washington, DC with specializations in African politics and economic development, and her BA from Rice University in Houston, Texas. She is currently a PhD student in comparative politics at New York University (NYU).

Project Administration

Elizabeth Welsh is part-time Project Manager for the African Legislatures Project located at the Centre for Social Science Research at the University of Cape Town. Formerly, she was Administrator at the Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE) at the University of Oxford (1993-2002). Ms. Welsh was also previously employed by OXFAM UK/I. and overseas assignments included three years in Mozambique (1986-89) and a year in northern Uganda managing a DfID-funded relief and rehabilitation program. She returned from the UK to South Africa in 2006 and has been working with not-for-profit organizations, including coordinating the People’s Health Movement (PHM-SA), the South African chapter of a global network focusing on training/capacity building and advocacy in health and human rights through the Right to Health Campaign.

Previous Project Administration

Lia Nijzink

The ALP Team: (from left to right:) Prof Joel D. Barkan, Prof Shaheen Mozaffar, Kimberly Smiddy, Elizabeth Welsh and Prof Robert MattesThe ALP Team: (from left to right:) Prof Joel D. Barkan, Prof Shaheen Mozaffar, Kimberly Smiddy, Elizabeth Welsh and Prof Robert Mattes